From Miller’s Rōnin #5.

From Miller’s Rōnin #5.

From Sam Kieth’s The Maxx: Maxximized #4. A bit of meta-commentary on Gaiman’s take on Death in The Sandman, I see.
This is one of the darkest stand-alone issues of comics I’ve ever read. Heartbreaking, matter-of-fact views on family, suicide, and codependency, among many other ideas. Go read it.

From Sam Kieth’s The Maxx: Maxximized #4A bit of meta-commentary on Gaiman’s take on Death in The Sandman, I see.

This is one of the darkest stand-alone issues of comics I’ve ever read. Heartbreaking, matter-of-fact views on family, suicide, and codependency, among many other ideas. Go read it.

YEAH!
From the Judge Dredd — Day Of Chaos storyline. 

YEAH!

From the Judge Dredd — Day Of Chaos storyline. 

Sexy crim-jams.
Buy here and support creator-owned work. First issue is free, so, you know. Come on. 

Sexy crim-jams.

Buy here and support creator-owned work. First issue is free, so, you know. Come on. 

I agree with this in a variety of ways.

I agree with this in a variety of ways.

From Jim Starlin’s 1975 on Warlock. 
There’s an essay in Douglas Wolk’s Reading Comics: How Graphic Novels Work And What They Mean called ‘The Dark Mirrors of Jim Starlin’s Warlock' that provides a fantastic analysis of this very unique comics collection. In Wolk's words:
‘The Warlock serial that Jim Starlin wrote and drew between 1974 and 1977 is a crazily dense, heady, philosophy-minded space opera that includes some of the oddest and most dazzling mainstream comic books of their era.’
Wolk on the primary function of Warlock:
‘Mostly, though, Starlin used Warlock as a vehicle for playing with various kinds of dichotomies and dialectics. There are a lot of neatly two-sided conflicts going on in the series—life versus death, order versus chaos, free will versus predestination, and so on—and the characters are only too happy to discuss their respective ideologies, even in the middle of a fight.’
In the particular panel I’ve posted, Thanos spouts a bit of existential Manichaeism at the evil, futuristic version of Warlock: the purple afro’d Magus. 
Good stuff.

From Jim Starlin’s 1975 on Warlock

There’s an essay in Douglas Wolk’s Reading Comics: How Graphic Novels Work And What They Mean called ‘The Dark Mirrors of Jim Starlin’s Warlock' that provides a fantastic analysis of this very unique comics collection. In Wolk's words:

The Warlock serial that Jim Starlin wrote and drew between 1974 and 1977 is a crazily dense, heady, philosophy-minded space opera that includes some of the oddest and most dazzling mainstream comic books of their era.’

Wolk on the primary function of Warlock:

Mostly, though, Starlin used Warlock as a vehicle for playing with various kinds of dichotomies and dialectics. There are a lot of neatly two-sided conflicts going on in the series—life versus death, order versus chaos, free will versus predestination, and so on—and the characters are only too happy to discuss their respective ideologies, even in the middle of a fight.’

In the particular panel I’ve posted, Thanos spouts a bit of existential Manichaeism at the evil, futuristic version of Warlock: the purple afro’d Magus. 

Good stuff.

A moving moment from a very important comics work.

A moving moment from a very important comics work.

Perfect rendering of Elektra by Chris Samnee. Appropriately hard facial features and hair length, gorgeous Mediterranean complexion (respect to Javier Rodriguez on colors). This should be the reference point for Ms. Natchios from here on out.
Vol. 3 wraps up soon, which is a bummer. Get issue #35 here.

(#35 of the current Daredevil run with him and Mark Waid). 

Perfect rendering of Elektra by Chris Samnee. Appropriately hard facial features and hair length, gorgeous Mediterranean complexion (respect to Javier Rodriguez on colors). This should be the reference point for Ms. Natchios from here on out.

Vol. 3 wraps up soon, which is a bummer. Get issue #35 here.

(#35 of the current Daredevil run with him and Mark Waid). 

From Roger McKenzie and Frank Miller’s Daredevil V. 1, issue #166.
The comics medium is unique, though you know this already.One thing I love about the medium is that it allows us to perceive ‘real-time’ as ‘all-time,’ or as simultaneous time. Just take a closer look at this panel above.
Do you notice how subtly dense the panel is? Do you see how much is going on in what could be considered a quick, breezy, almost interstitial filler panel? The A. and B. stories happening at the same time—in the same panel. The A. story is obviously the Matt Murdock story, the B. being the Foggy-Gets-Married plot. It’s obvious to a point where we don’t even register it. We’re ‘in’ the story. 
Comics.

From Roger McKenzie and Frank Miller’s Daredevil V. 1, issue #166.


The comics medium is unique, though you know this already.One thing I love about the medium is that it allows us to perceive ‘real-time’ as ‘all-time,’ or as simultaneous time. Just take a closer look at this panel above.

Do you notice how subtly dense the panel is? Do you see how much is going on in what could be considered a quick, breezy, almost interstitial filler panel? The A. and B. stories happening at the same time—in the same panel. The A. story is obviously the Matt Murdock story, the B. being the Foggy-Gets-Married plot. It’s obvious to a point where we don’t even register it. We’re ‘in’ the story. 

Comics.

Adorable.
Simon Bisley’s rendering of Judge Death in Judgement On Gotham by John Wagner. Can (and should) be bought here. Because it is so good.

Adorable.

Simon Bisley’s rendering of Judge Death in Judgement On Gotham by John Wagner. Can (and should) be bought here. Because it is so good.